Upcoming Research Seminars Centre for Dance Research, University of Roehampton

 

Culture as Realised in Dance Research: A Primary Enquiry Dr. Chifang Chao, Associate Professor, Dept. of Dance, Taipei National University of the Arts

Date: Thursday 20 February 2014

Time: 6pm-7.30pm

Place: DU.001, Duchesne Building, Digby Stuart College, University of Roehampton

Cost: Free

The study of dancing is essentially a study of humanity. However, the questions, approaches, perspectives and exegeses all differ from culture to culture, and even from time to time under the same academic tradition. In my presentation, I shall try to reflect upon the questions that I have asked in terms of how culture can be realised through the research of dance, and how, through mainly the approach of contemporary anthropology, culture can be realised in exploring the knowledge of dancing. I will try to compare briefly the East Asian perspective to personhood manifested in dancing as both the practice and knowledge through examining some early Chinese Mandarin literature. The presentation is aimed to open cross-cultural discussion on how dance research has played an integral part in the expansion of our knowledge of the world and human beings.

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Step Dancing in Ireland: Embodiments of Culture and Identity Dr Catherine Foley, Course Director MA Ethnochoreology and MA Irish Traditional Dance Performance, The Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, University of Limerick

Date: Thursday 6 March 2014

Time: 6pm-7.30pm

Place: DU.001, Duchesne Building, Digby Stuart College, University of Roehampton

Cost: Free

Economic, social and political circumstances shape notions of culture and identity and in Ireland, as in many other cultures around the world, this has been particularly expressed through dance. In this talk I will focus on one dance form, step dancing, and I will discuss how transformations in Irish culture have been witness to different embodiments and expressions of culture and identity through the step dancing body. I will also explore how the transnationalisation of Irish step dancing has ensured a multiplicity of voices and identities which have also contributed to current discourses and cultural understandings of Irish dancing.

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How did Dance and Mime Separate? Jean-Gaspard Deburau in Nineteenth-century France Dr Edward Nye, ELF Fellow and Senior Modern Languages Tutor, Lincoln College Oxford

Date: Thursday 13 March 2014

Time: 6pm-7.30pm

Place: DU.001, Duchesne Building, Digby Stuart College, University of Roehampton

Cost: Free

Historically, mime and dance were closely related. From Lucian’s famous 2nd-century treatise ‘Of Dance’ to early modern genres like the Commedia dell’arte and to the more recent genre of Romantic ballet, performers and spectators expected a close relationship between narrative and non-narrative movement. Modern scholars invariably discuss the divorce between the two in terms of dance choosing to separate from mime, but in fact it was mime which first established itself as fully autonomous from dance with the advent of the seminal mime artist Jean-Gaspard Deburau, who performed in Paris at the Funumbules Theatre in the first half of the nineteenth century. In retrospect, he invented the image and character of the white-faced Pierrot which has endured to this day in one form or another. If the image has become a cliché, Deburau was in fact cutting edge in his time. He essentially invented what we think of today, generically, as mime. This seminar will focus on what he did, and how it relates to contemporary forms of dance in which mime played a large part: Romantic ballet and the ballet d’action.

Centre for Dance Research: http://www.roehampton.ac.uk/Research-Centres/Centre-for-Dance-Research/Events/

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