Category Archives: Journal Call

PAUST online platform call for submissions 2016

The interdisciplinary group PAUST are inviting papers of aprox. 1000 words to be hosted in the PAUST online platform within the coming months. PAUST are a collaborative group operating since November 2014 in the fields of Performance Architecture Urbanism Space and Theatre.

We strive to promote the overlooked but long standing connection across the disciplines of architecture and performance theatre and contribute to the development of knowledge in the emerging field of study. Our mission is therefore the creation of a shared theoretical framework based on the common ground of Performance Architecture Urbanism Space and Theatre, a worldwide panorama of practices and interests for activating and transforming space.

 

The theme of your submissions should demonstrate an interdisciplinary approach to any of the subjects stated in the group’s name. Please visit the platform to familiarize yourself with the research areas of PAUST.

All submissions should be received by the deadline of May 15th and successful submissions will be notified by the group within 2 weeks of submission. Publications will happen on a weekly roll-out post acceptance and you will be notified of the exact date. All successful submissions will be advertised on the PAUST facebook page, with a follow up of likes and shares.

 

Please note the following submission guidelines:

– length: 750-1250 words

– references and quotations to preferably follow the Harvard Zotero system, but other academic systems can also be accepted.

– keywords and tags: as many as are applicable

– images: it is obligatory to send at least one image (with credits stated where appropriate) in the following formats: resolution 75dpi / sizes: for the text thread @672px width x 372px height and to feature as a thumbnail @600px width x 200px height

– small bio of max 200 words

– one portrait image of yourself

 

Please send all submissions to the following address: paustgroup@gmail.com under the title: PAUST Callout 2016

Extended deadline Bodily Undoing: Somatics as Practices of Critique

Journal of Dance and Somatic Practices, Special Issue 9.1

Bodily Undoing: Somatics as Practices of Critique

Edited by Thomas Kampe and Kirsty Alexander

Deadline for full articles: 1st May 2016

Bodily Undoing: Somatics as Practices of Critique

The transdisciplinary discourse of dance and somatic practices has moved beyond the state of identifying the field.

This special issue of JDSP calls for papers that explore and expose the socially and culturally transformative potential of somatics and somatic-informed performance practices. Somatic practices are processes of undoing existing patterns so that new ones can emerge. How can this undoing be extended beyond the body of the individual to the body politic or the social body? How might we construct somatics as practices of critique that might contribute to an alternative social imaginary?

Submissions might:

Self reflectively critique the field of somatics or one’s individual practice within that, in relation to the possibility of social change

Explore the application of somatic practices as subversive modalities of interacting with the world in other fields or disciplines

Explore emancipatory possibilities through foregrounding somatic experience

Unpack the historical roots of somatic practices in relation to wider critical cultures

Examine the political reverberations of somatically informed performance practice

Explore the socio- cultural or political potential of touch based practices

Examine non reductionist and embodied modes of thought provoked by somatic practices

Question cultural hierarchies and structures of power within and / or through somatic practices

(this list is exemplary only and by no means exhaustive of the possibilities)

Whilst scholarly articles are particularly encouraged, we welcome a range of other modes of submission, all subject to peer review. Please see the guidelines for further details.

Page 1 of 2

Journal of Dance and Somatic Practices, Special Issue 9.1

Submissions:

Please include article title, abstract (200 words), keywords and full article. In another document, please include author’s name and affiliation, biography (200 words), postal and email address. Please submit in Word format.

Guidelines: http://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/MediaManager/File/JDSP_4_2_NFC_299-300.pdf and

http://jdsp.coventry.ac.uk/Home.html

Artist’s pages: Please submit a pdf with how you wish the article to appear in print, along with text (Word) and any images (tiff/jpeg/pdf, 300dpi) attached separately in the same email.

All submissions should be sent direct to: Hetty Blades: ac1417@coventry.ac.uk

Enquiries about content to the Editors:
Thomas Kampe: t.kampe@bathspa.ac.uk
Kirsty Alexander: kirsty@independentdance.co.uk

REMINDER: CfC – WORDS AND DANCE/Choreographic Practices Journal – Special Issue

Choreographic Practices (Intellect Press)

Special Issue, Spring 2017

 

WORDS and DANCE

 

Guest Associate Editor: Robert Vesty (Middlesex University)

 

Call for Contributions

Deadline for full essays: June 1st 2016

 

This special journal issue of Choreographic Practices – WORDS and DANCE – aims to draw together, contribute to and exemplify debates around the use of spoken word in current and future 21st Century dance practices as well as its place in the contemporary cultural landscape.

 

What are the intersections between spoken words (in the form of live narrative, poetry, dialogue or writing) and choreographic practices?

What is the relationship between the word and the move? 

How can/do spoken words and dance work together, especially in improvisatory practice?

What implications does the use of voice have in dance practice?

 

Choreographic Practices provides a space for disseminating choreographic practices, critical inquiry and debate. Serving the needs of students, teachers, academics and practitioners in dance (and the related fields of theatre, live art, video/media, and performance), the journal operates from the principle that dance embodies ideas and can be productively enlivened when considered as a mode of critical and creative discourse. This journal seeks to engender dynamic relationships between theory and practice, choreographer and scholar, such that these distinctions may be shifted and traversed. See:http://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/journals/view-journal,id=170/view,page=0/

 

This special issue emerges from a workshop/symposium in which artists and scholars were invited to engage with the question – What Skills Are Required of the Dancer and Poet to Produce Dance and Poetry in Performance? This day-long event ended a week-long workshop and performance event led by dance artists and poets Julyen Hamilton and Billie Hanne at Chisenhale Dance Space, London entitled Space and Words for Dancers. It brought together twenty-five dance artists working through improvisatory practice to engage with the issues of space and words. It looked at how words take space; how their geometry is somatically informed. It engaged questions to do with the place spoken words can have in instant composition.  This special issue draws, in part, from this event, while aiming to embrace wider concerns in a broader context at a time where it could be said there is a resurgence of interest in spoken word (and especially poetry) in relation to dance and other artistic practices.

 

We seek new critical insights into interdisciplinary, immersive, participatory and collaborative dance practices, and an articulation of how these may elucidate the way in which spoken words are used by dancers in choreographic practice. Submissions that reflect upon the historic lineages of contemporary dance in Europe and their relationship to new and emerging contexts are welcome. Contributions that capture and articulate choreographic practices explicitly engaging with poetry, aesthetically, thematically, politically or socially, and employ practice-as-research/practice-led research as a methodology are especially encouraged.

 

The above might include considerations of:

  • Ways in which dance practices might both respond to and shape the use of spoken word in 21stcentury performance practice.
  • Contemporary relationships to representations of the political body and identity through dance practices that incorporate spoken words.
  • Experimental approaches to dance making that make explicit the use of spoken words with a particular focus on instant composition as a methodology.
  • Somatically informed approaches to vocal practice.
  • Contemporary propositions for the interpretation, experience, critique and creation of dance that uses spoken word either for or as poetry.

 

We ask that authors/artists submit articles or artists pages that articulate these territories and offer refreshing critical angles on contemporary practice and its place in our cultural experience.  Contributions to this discourse may be in the form of research essays, transcribed debates, interviews, performance documentation, poems, collections of words, and the like.

 

 

How to Submit to Choreographic Practices

 

It is our intention to publish this special issue in Spring 2017, therefore your contribution would need to be sent byJune 1st 2016 at:  ChoreographicPractices@live.co.uk 

 

If you have any questions about the theme or focus of your submission please, in the first instance, contact Robert Vesty (associate editor for this special issue): R.Vesty@mdx.ac.uk

___________

 

Choreographic Practices is an international peer-reviewed journal, thereby all articles published in the journal undergo rigorous peer-review, based on initial editor screening and anonymised refereeing by at least two anonymous referees. All reviewers are internationally recognized in their fields.  Peer-review reports will normally be returned to us within two months and the editors will provide feedback to you shortly after. Submission of an article to the journal will be taken to imply that it presents original, unpublished work not under consideration for publication elsewhere. By submitting a manuscript, the authors agree that the exclusive rights to reproduce and distribute the article have been given to the publishers.

Instructions for Authors

Submissions:

  1. Full article (approx 6,000 words or equivalent in other formats), including article title, abstract (200 words) and 6 keywords.
  2. And, in another document, please include author’s name and affiliation, biography (200 words),
  3. Plus contact details – both postal and email addresses.

 

Format: Word format

 

File Labeling: Clearly name your file with the title of your submission

 

Spacing and fonts: Please double-space your article and use Arial (or similar) font, size 11 or 12.

 

Referencing: Choreographic Practices follows the Harvard Style Guide with a full reference list at the end of the article.  See Intellect’s Style Guide for full presentation details.

 

Images: Choreographic Practices will be able to carry photographic images. If you have access to high quality images appropriate for your article it would be very helpful if you could send 2 or 3 such images in a separate file but with your article. Images should be sent as JPeg or tiff files at 300 dpi. If you are able to send us images please ensure that each contains relevant information including date, title and name of photographer and that the file name is clear.

  1. You are responsible for obtaining all appropriate permissions.

 

Writing style: We encourage a diverse range of writing styles and layouts in line with the form, purpose and content of each submission. You might also consider our readership of dance artists, scholars, students, teachers, academics and practitioners in dance and related fields when writing. It will also be assumed that the author has obtained all necessary permissions to include in the paper items such as quotations, musical examples, images, tables, etc

 

If you have more general questions about Choreographic Practices or how to submit, contact, Vida Midgelow at:  ChoreographicPractices@live.co.uk

Call for Abstracts – Computing the Corporeal

Special issue of Computational Culture, a Journal of Software Studies

Edited by Nicolas Salazar Sutil, Sita Popat and Scott deLahunta

 

Outline

Intersections between human movement, computer science and motion-tracking/sensing technologies have led to novel ways of transferring body data from physical to digital contexts. From a practical perspective, this integration requires engagement across key disciplines, including movement studies, kinesiology, kinematics, biomechanics, biomedical science and health studies, dance science, sports science, and computer science. This development has also provoked theoretical and critical discourse that has tried to preserve, based on its grounding on bodily and kinetic practice, the differentiation of lived-in and body-specific knowledge. Here is a mode of datarization perhaps closer to what Deleuze (1988) called “immediate datum”: i.e. information stemming not from an abstract and re-moved conceptualization, but from real-world experience of movement, and the immediate perception or capture of kinetic information through physical or sensorial means. Within the field of software studies, advancing a sense of digital materialism has raised concerns for the materiality of technological media, for instance by focusing on the physical constraints of data storage, or the material dimension of computing. But what about “immediation”, i.e. immediate computation of bodily movement by machines for immediate expression, representation or enactment in digital contexts? And what of the representability of such immediation? How can we describe movement and preserve its datum of difference within a scriptable or graphicable computer language without falling into a universal sameness, a movement without bodies?

Whilst the idea that immediate data may demand a “bodying forth” (Thrift 2008), a traffic of bodiliness from biological to technological contexts, it is necessary to de-homogenise the ‘body’ category. Perhaps what is needed is an understanding of “corporeality” that assume multidimensional and relativistic realities of bodies instead, opening up nuanced discourses based on specific body-related ontologies (corpuscles, builds, anatomies, skeletons, muscle systems) all making up a non-singular sense of the bodily real. As such, this collection poses the problem of criteria. Our question is this: how and to what effect does the research community adopt arbitrary criteria in order to compute the body and bodily movement? Can we define narratives emerging from this body-computing arbitration to provoke a critique?

There is a possible tension between “bodying forth”— the idea of a single body operative across both biological and computational contexts—and corporeal relations. We would like to focus this critical edition on the relations between differentiated anatomical or bodily systems (skeletal, muscular, nerve, etc.), and different modes of computation, as well as different theoretical discourses stemming from this experiential basis. If we recognize the problem of relationality we must assume that more than one complex set of co-relations meet when the machine computes the moving human body. How do we start the process of computer-generated learning in terms of selecting body parts, functions, organs, processes, on the one hand, and key languages, code, or indeed technological tools for capture on the other? To what extent does corporeal computing contribute to certain bodily systems (or perhaps even body types) becoming the key agents of action, and indeed learning, in such contexts? How do we respond critically to privileged systems (the skeletal, the muscular), and body types (so called ‘normal bodies’)? To what extent are computational paradigms still dominated by spatial, extensive and quantitative determinations (i.e. the tracking of skeleton, body geometry, kinematic shapes, etc.) that hide other, more intensive, modes of corporeality? And finally, how do we reintegrate the multiplicity of the corporeal in a computational synthesis? For instance, how can we understand the quantitative and qualitative (dynamics, effort, tone, intensity, etc.) as overlapping data priorities?

 

Topics or projects might include:

  • Computable relations between bodies and digital avatars, digital dance representations, digital sports representations, digital health representations, digital animation— digital bodies in general.
  • Computable relations between biological bodies and robotic systems.
  • Computing relations between physical movement and abstract thought, automated thought (AI) or machine learning.
  • Computing mobility studies (i.e. relations between body and automobile, body and assisted mobility machines, body and prosthetics).
  • Computing sociokinetic material (i.e. computing the movement of groups of bodies).
  • Affective corporeal computing— the capacity to process psychophysical and cognitive processes within corporeal movement (e.g. computing effort, dynamics, tonicity, emotion).
  • Integration of quantitative and qualitative body datasets.
  • Metabody theory and notions of meta-anatomy, meta-strata in the ontological literature (i.e. movement of digital ghosts, sprites, techno-animism, etc.)

750 word abstracts should be emailed to n.salazar(at)leeds.ac.uk April 17th.  

Any queries can be addressed to Nicolas Salazar Sutil at n.salazar(at)leeds.ac.uk, or Sita Popat at s.popat(at)leeds.ac.uk, or Scott deLahunta at scott(at)motionbank.org.

Abstracts will be reviewed by the Computational Culture Editorial Board and the special issue editors. Authors of selected abstracts will be notified by April 24th and invited to submit full manuscripts by September 26th. These manuscripts are subject to full blind peer review according to Computational Culture’s policies. The issue will be published in January 2017.

Computational Culture is an online open-access peer-reviewed journal of inter-disciplinary enquiry into the nature of cultural computational objects, practices, processes and structures.

http://computationalculture.net/

Call for Contributions – WORDS AND DANCE/Choreographic Practices Journal – Special Issue

Choreographic Practices (Intellect Press)

Special Issue, Spring 2017

 

WORDS and DANCE

 

Guest Associate Editor: Robert Vesty (Middlesex University)

 

Call for Contributions

Deadline for full essays: June 1st 2016

 

This special journal issue of Choreographic Practices – WORDS and DANCE – aims to draw together, contribute to and exemplify debates around the use of spoken word in current and future 21st Century dance practices as well as its place in the contemporary cultural landscape.

 

What are the intersections between spoken words (in the form of live narrative, poetry, dialogue or writing) and choreographic practices?

What is the relationship between the word and the move? 

How can/do spoken words and dance work together, especially in improvisatory practice?

What implications does the use of voice have in dance practice?

 

Choreographic Practices provides a space for disseminating choreographic practices, critical inquiry and debate. Serving the needs of students, teachers, academics and practitioners in dance (and the related fields of theatre, live art, video/media, and performance), the journal operates from the principle that dance embodies ideas and can be productively enlivened when considered as a mode of critical and creative discourse. This journal seeks to engender dynamic relationships between theory and practice, choreographer and scholar, such that these distinctions may be shifted and traversed. See:http://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/journals/view-journal,id=170/view,page=0/

 

This special issue emerges from a workshop/symposium in which artists and scholars were invited to engage with the question – What Skills Are Required of the Dancer and Poet to Produce Dance and Poetry in Performance? This day-long event ended a week-long workshop and performance event led by dance artists and poets Julyen Hamilton and Billie Hanne at Chisenhale Dance Space, London entitled Space and Words for Dancers. It brought together twenty-five dance artists working through improvisatory practice to engage with the issues of space and words. It looked at how words take space; how their geometry is somatically informed. It engaged questions to do with the place spoken words can have in instant composition.  This special issue draws, in part, from this event, while aiming to embrace wider concerns in a broader context at a time where it could be said there is a resurgence of interest in spoken word (and especially poetry) in relation to dance and other artistic practices.

 

We seek new critical insights into interdisciplinary, immersive, participatory and collaborative dance practices, and an articulation of how these may elucidate the way in which spoken words are used by dancers in choreographic practice. Submissions that reflect upon the historic lineages of contemporary dance in Europe and their relationship to new and emerging contexts are welcome. Contributions that capture and articulate choreographic practices explicitly engaging with poetry, aesthetically, thematically, politically or socially, and employ practice-as-research/practice-led research as a methodology are especially encouraged.

 

The above might include considerations of:

  • Ways in which dance practices might both respond to and shape the use of spoken word in 21stcentury performance practice.
  • Contemporary relationships to representations of the political body and identity through dance practices that incorporate spoken words.
  • Experimental approaches to dance making that make explicit the use of spoken words with a particular focus on instant composition as a methodology.
  • Somatically informed approaches to vocal practice.
  • Contemporary propositions for the interpretation, experience, critique and creation of dance that uses spoken word either for or as poetry.

 

We ask that authors/artists submit articles or artists pages that articulate these territories and offer refreshing critical angles on contemporary practice and its place in our cultural experience.  Contributions to this discourse may be in the form of research essays, transcribed debates, interviews, performance documentation, poems, collections of words, and the like.

 

 

How to Submit to Choreographic Practices

 

It is our intention to publish this special issue in Spring 2017, therefore your contribution would need to be sent by June 1st 2016 at:  ChoreographicPractices@live.co.uk 

 

If you have any questions about the theme or focus of your submission please, in the first instance, contact Robert Vesty (associate editor for this special issue): R.Vesty@mdx.ac.uk

___________

 

Choreographic Practices is an international peer-reviewed journal, thereby all articles published in the journal undergo rigorous peer-review, based on initial editor screening and anonymised refereeing by at least two anonymous referees. All reviewers are internationally recognized in their fields.  Peer-review reports will normally be returned to us within two months and the editors will provide feedback to you shortly after. Submission of an article to the journal will be taken to imply that it presents original, unpublished work not under consideration for publication elsewhere. By submitting a manuscript, the authors agree that the exclusive rights to reproduce and distribute the article have been given to the publishers.

Instructions for Authors

Submissions:

  1. Full article (approx 6,000 words or equivalent in other formats), including article title, abstract (200 words) and 6 keywords.
  2. And, in another document, please include author’s name and affiliation, biography (200 words),
  3. Plus contact details – both postal and email addresses.

 

Format: Word format

 

File Labeling: Clearly name your file with the title of your submission

 

Spacing and fonts: Please double-space your article and use Arial (or similar) font, size 11 or 12.

 

Referencing: Choreographic Practices follows the Harvard Style Guide with a full reference list at the end of the article.  See Intellect’s Style Guide for full presentation details.

 

Images: Choreographic Practices will be able to carry photographic images. If you have access to high quality images appropriate for your article it would be very helpful if you could send 2 or 3 such images in a separate file but with your article. Images should be sent as JPeg or tiff files at 300 dpi. If you are able to send us images please ensure that each contains relevant information including date, title and name of photographer and that the file name is clear.

  1. You are responsible for obtaining all appropriate permissions.

 

Writing style: We encourage a diverse range of writing styles and layouts in line with the form, purpose and content of each submission. You might also consider our readership of dance artists, scholars, students, teachers, academics and practitioners in dance and related fields when writing. It will also be assumed that the author has obtained all necessary permissions to include in the paper items such as quotations, musical examples, images, tables, etc

 

If you have more general questions about Choreographic Practices or how to submit, contact, Vida Midgelow at:  ChoreographicPractices@live.co.uk

 

We very much look forward to receiving your submissions and continuing the conversation,

Journal of Dance and Somatic Practices submission deadline extended

The Journal of Dance and Somatic Practices (ISSN 1757-1871) is an international refereed journal published twice a year by Intellect. It has been in publication since 2009 for scholars and practitioners whose research interests focus on the relationship between dance and somatic practices, and the influence that this body of practice exerts on the wider performing arts.
 
In recent years, somatic practices have become more central to many artists’ work and have become more established within educational and training programmes. Despite this, as a body of work it has remained largely at the margins of scholarly debate, finding its presence predominantly through the embodied knowledge of practitioners and their performative contributions.
 
This journal provides a space to debate the work, to consider the impact and influence of the work on performance and discuss the implications for research and teaching. The journal serves a broad international community and invites contributions from a wide range of discipline areas. Particular features include writings that consciously traverse the boundaries between text and performance, taking the form of ‘visual essays’, interviews with leading practitioners, book reviews, themed issues and conference/symposium reports.
 
We invite contributions in varied formats. Writing that combines images and illustrations is encouraged, as is reflective writing. Standard articles will be in the range of 4000-6000 words. A more flexible approach may be possible for other formats and styles of submission but contributors need to work within the existing Journal design template (a free to view issue) is available on the Intellect website as illustration).  If a contributor wants to deviate from the template it must be discussed with the Editor first and prior to submission. 
 
Themes might include:
 
*The pedagogical philosophy of somatics and how this might be seen to challenge or negate  dominant approaches to learning and creativity
*The history of somatic practices
*The current application of somatics to dance/performing arts training and education
*The aesthetic implications of working with/from a somatic understanding
*The ‘body’ as a site of discourse in western culture, the influence of eastern cultures on notions of embodiment and how somatic practices challenge/collude with these ideas.
 
The deadline has been extended. Submissions should be sent to Hetty Blades ac1417@coventry.ac.uk by 28th February 2016
 
Please see http://jdsp.coventry.ac.uk/Home.html for further information about the journal. 

Call for articles ‘Dance and the Goddess: She in the dance’ – Special Issues of The Journal of Dance, Movement and Spiritualities

The Journal of Dance, Movement and Spiritualities invites contributions for a third special issue titled: ‘Dance and the Goddess: She in the dance’. This issue responds to the wider cultural revival, interest and re-emergence of the Goddess in contemporary cultures. The issue will document how She is appearing in contemporary dance practices, Somatics movement modalities, performance, therapeutic practice (and in personal sensory moving experience).  The journal seeks to embrace a diversity of experienced and felt spiritualities and discussion of methodologies suited to discovering more about dance and spirituality are most welcome, as well as innovative methods for recording, digesting and articulating the experiences of spirituality.

Topics may include:
·         Goddess spirituality and dance in ancient cultures and civilizations
·         Goddess spirituality related to Deep-ecology, environmentalism and dance
·         Goddess spirituality in Jungian dance/movement forms
·         Buddhism, Goddess and dance/movement
·         Dance, folklore, legend, earth mysteries, symbols and myths
·         Feminisms, feminist debates, dance and embodiment
·         Earth-centred moving relationships
·         Somatics movement and gendered research
·         Archetypical goddesses in performance and/or therapeutic practices
·         Gendered debates, ambiguities and tensions

The submission date for this issue is: 1st of November 2016. Standard articles will be in the range of 5000-8000 words, including a 150 word abstract, six indicative key words, institutional affiliation and a short biography.

Call for articles: The Journal of Dance, Movement and Spiritualities

We invite contributions for Dance, Movement and Spiritualities. Standard articles will be in the range of 5000-8000 words, including a 150 word abstract, six indicative key words, institutional affiliation and a short biography.

Article submission dates for JDMS are March 15th 2016 and June 15th  2016.

Example topics may include – but are not limited to:

·      The intersections between religion, spirituality and dance
·      The meeting points between health, movement and spirituality
·      The cultural production and historization of spirituality in relation to the growth of dance and  movement practices
·      Spirituality, gender and dance/movement
·      The impact of secularization on Dance Education
·      Connections between philosophy, spirituality and dance/movement
·      The emergence and appreciation of new forms of spiritual dance in Western contexts otherwise undocumented (both popular and  academic)
·      The documentation of spiritual forms associated with institutionalized religion
·      Dance/movement forms aligned with non-institutionalized spirituality (evolving forms linked to New Age Spirituality and the holistic spirituality paradigm)
·      Secular spiritualities underpinning practice, performance and pedagogy
·      Postmodern spiritualities underpinning practice, performance and pedagogy
·      Movement/dance forms conversant with Feminist Spirituality
·      Embodied and somatic spiritualities
·      Jungian/post-Jungian dance/movement forms
·      The influence of non-Western/Eastern sacred narratives as they continue to inform Western dance practice
·      Intercultural, cross-cultural and multicultural perspectives
·      Creative transformation and life-force celebration
·      Shamanic dance traditions
·      Mysticism, movement and dance

The journal offers a diverse platform for scholars working within and across the fields of Dance Studies, Theology/Religious Studies, Anthropology, Ethnography, Sociology, Health Studies, Dance Movement Psychotherapy and Dance Histories. Dedicated to cross-dialogue and the potential inventive perspectives interdisciplinary collaboration generates, the journal aims to progress the academic study of spirituality in Dance Studies.

Journal Site http://www.dance-somatics-and-spiritualities.com/academic-journal

Journal of Dance and Somatic Practices Special Issue – Call for Contributions

Call for Papers and Contributions

Journal of Dance and Somatic Practices

Issue 9.1, Bodily Undoing: Somatics as Practices of Critique

 (published January, 2017)

Edited by Thomas Kampe and Kirsty Alexander

Deadline for full articles: 1st April 2016

 

Bodily Undoing: Somatics as Practices of Critique

The transdisciplinary discourse of dance and somatic practices has moved beyond the state of identifying the field.

This special issue of JDSP calls for papers that explore and expose the socially and culturally transformative potential of somatics and somatic-informed performance practices. Somatic practices are processes of undoing existing patterns so that new ones can emerge.  How can this undoing be extended beyond the body of the individual to the body politic or the social body? How might we construct somatics as practices of critique that might contribute to an alternative social imaginary?

Submissions might:

Self reflectively critique the field of somatics or one’s individual practice within that, in relation to the possibility of social change

Explore the application of somatic practices as subversive modalities of interacting with the world in other fields or disciplines

Explore emancipatory possibilities through foregrounding somatic experience

Unpack the historical roots of somatic practices in relation to wider critical cultures

Examine the political reverberations of somatically informed performance practice

Explore the socio- cultural or political potential of touch based practices

Examine non reductionist and embodied modes of thought provoked by somatic practices

Question cultural hierarchies and structures of power within and / or through somatic practices

(this list is exemplary only and by no means exhaustive of the possibilities)

Whilst scholarly articles are particularly encouraged, we welcome a range of other modes of submission, all subject to peer review. Please see the guidelines for further details.

 

 

Submissions:

Please include article title, abstract (200 words), keywords and full article. In another document, please include author’s name and affiliation, biography (200 words), postal and email address. Please submit in Word format.

 

Guidelineshttp://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/MediaManager/File/JDSP_4_2_NFC_299-300.pdf andhttp://jdsp.coventry.ac.uk/Home.html

Artist’s pages: Please submit a pdf with how you wish the article to appear in print, along with text (Word) and any images (tiff/jpeg/pdf, 300dpi) attached separately in the same email.

All submissions should be sent direct to:

Hetty Blades: ac1417@coventry.ac.uk

Enquiries about content to : kirsty@independentdance.co.uk or  t.kampe@bathspa.ac.uk