Category Archives: Practice-as-research

DR@FT Open Forum 2 at Falmouth

Open Forum II

 One must continually make and continually fail in order to create’

O’Gorman & Werry, Performance Research, Vol 17:1

Wednesday 17th February 2015 6-8.30pm

AMATA Production Space from 6pm

Sharing in studio B

Evening will feature presentations from staff and research students on current research relating to dance and performance and improvisation.

Presentations:

  • Kuldip Singh Barmi, Jana Bitterova & Oak Matthias: Practice no 93 performers in space directed by the present moment.
  • Rosie Enys: Research as improvisation: exploring spaces of (dis)comfort and (un)certainty
  • Frankie Williams: Total Decoy: on the subject of the gesture of looking away in the modalities of embarrassment, mis-attention and failure in performance related art practice. 

 

There will be time for questions after each presentation and continuing to respond to the research theme of Creative, Connected Communities, the open discussion will follow the presentations by discussing the broad notion of failure as acreative resource with the following questions as starting points:

  • How can improvisation, mis-performance and discomfort be an explicit part of making and performing processes within a rhetoric of community that only celebrates success?
  • What happens in performance making and doing when things go ‘wrong’? What happens when we are not looking, not paying attention, when things do not go to plan?
  • How can creative failure be embraced as a positive quality in institutional contexts and create a climate that values research over outcome?

http://amata.org.uk/draft-news

Yes! Drinks & nibbles ARE provided, please RSVP for catering purposes:

ruth.pethybridge@falmouth.ac.uk

Convener: DR@FT Dance Research at Falmouth

Call for participation in performance architectures/wearable performance event, April 2016

*call for participation*

“Performance Architectures, Wearables & Gestures of Participation”

Artaud Forum 5
Brunel University London
Antonin Artaud Performance Centre

Thursday, 7 April: Symposium 16:oo – 2o:oo
International  Laboratory
Friday and Saturday, April 8– 9, 2016
Call for submissions and enrolment in artistic–research workshop & symposium, followed by performances, exhibitions and screenings, and training classes in immersion performance

Please send abstracts (300 words plus bio) or proposals for installations, provocations, film, or performance, to
Johannes Birringer
johannes.birringer@brunel.ac.uk

The context for this international workshop, the fifth Artaud Forum held at Brunel Unversity, is the collaborative European project “Metabody” which works to redefine bodies in media, performance and design. Over the past few years, ‘Metabody’ has developed new architectures and immersive environments which behave like living organisms that have an auditory, visual, and tactile sensory quality, with subtly changing states and affordances, they can be worn and breathed, felt and imagined, transported and taken off.

We invite participants to join us and work with these concepts of integrative tactile experience, kinetic atmospheres, multiperspectival space, and unconscious perception.
‘Metabody’ counteracts dominant technologies and their prevalent tendency to negate differences by reducing bodies and movements to prescribed forms in current surveillance culture. ‘Metabody’ emphasizes openness, and indeterminacy of embodied expressions as a key factor for a sustainable society. This project also foregrounds the need for a new politics. The workshop & performance laboratory probes troubling interpretations of the increasing unrestrainment of capital, and capitalism’s impact on all social-economic, cultural, creative, and educational sectors in a shared developed world now expanded by massive migration and refugee movement. The sustainability of democracy is an urgent theme for all those in the performing arts/creative fields becoming intensely aware of the multiplication of realities (virtualization; networked infrastructures, diasporas) and the tightening of our bodies into technological environments. This is a call for peripheral perception in existential experience.
*      *      *

Our theatre and studio spaces will be available for physical and conceptual workshop encounters over a period of three days (Thursday through Saturday, April 79), including public performances, exhibitions, screenings, and urban situations. There will be an enrollment fee necessary to cover costs for technical arrangements but they will include some of the catering. The fee for the three-day public event is £ 75  (£ 60 concession) for the whole, or £ 30 (£ 20 concession) per day.

Accommodations can be booked at Brunel’s Lancaster Suites Hotel / Brunel University London, Uxbridge UB8 3PH. Tel. +44 (0) 1895 268006 / email: lancaster-suite@brunel.ac.u

Curated by Johannes Birringer
Venue: Artaud Performance Centre
Brunel University London, Cleveland Rd UB78 3PH
@DAP_Lab
http://people.brunel.ac.uk/dap/metabody.html
www.metabody.eu

International Centre for Movement Event February 27th 2016

International Centre for Movement

curated by

MA/MFA Movement: Directing and Teaching

Royal Central School of Speech and Drama, University of London

 

Integrative Performance Practice

 

Led by Dr Experience Bryon

 

February 27th 2016 10-2 in Rehearsal Room 4 West Block

 

The ICM is a new centre for the ongoing professional development of movement teachers, movement directors and other movement practitioners working in theatre, actor training and allied fields.  In its pilot phase the aim of the centre is to hold a series of encounters that will develop movement practitioners through practical workshops, discussion and to connect movement practitioners across specialisms.

 

In the ICM’s next event Experience will be offering a practical insight into Integrative Performance Practice (IPP). Her approach to practice allows optimal ability while acting, singing/sounding, and dancing/moving, without the compromise of technical excellence. IPP is a way of working that shifts how performers engage with their training, conditioning, and performance disciplines. It synthesizes the various elements of performance work in order to empower the performer, as they practice across disciplines within any genre, style or aesthetic.

 

The IPP is designed not as a negotiation of various performing techniques, but rather as one practice through which any combinations of disciplinary expression can emerge with excellence.This workshop will be an introduction the core practices and premises of the Integrative Performance Practice.

 

Experience Bryon is Senior Lecturer at the Royal Central School of Speech and Drama serving as Course leader for the MA in Performance Practice as Research as well as being the Practice as Research Coordinator for the Research Degrees. As an early pioneer of Integrative Performance she brings to the table 20 years of Practice as Research within the area of interdisciplinary performance making. She is author of Integrative Performance: Practice and Research for the Interdisciplinary Performer, Routledge, 2014 and is currently working on a new book about performance and transdisciplinarity, exploring problematics, possibilities and pragmatics when performance encounters other disciplines.  For more details about her practice please see www.integrativeperformancepractice.com

 

Venue

Royal Central School of Speech and Drama, Eton Avenue, London, NW3 3HY, UK

http://www.cssd.ac.uk/content/how-find-us

Your place is bookable in advance for £15

Please email ayse.tashkiran@cssd.ac.uk

You will need:

Comfortable movement clothing, be prepared to work with bare feet and bring a yoga style mat

Announce yourself at reception when you arrive

Enquiries

Please email Ayse Tashkiran on ayse.tashkiran@cssd.ac.uk the MA/MFA Movement: Directing and Teaching co course leader with any queries

http://www.cssd.ac.uk/course/movement-directing-and-teaching-mamfa

performance architectures/wearable performance event, April 2016

*call for participation*

“Performance Architectures, Wearables & Gestures of Participation”

Artaud Forum 5
Brunel University London
Antonin Artaud Performance Centre

Thursday, 7 April: Symposium 16:oo – 2o:oo
International  Laboratory
Friday and Saturday, April 8- 9, 2016
Call for submissions and enrolment in artistic–research workshop & symposium, followed by performances, exhibitions and screenings, and training classes in immersion performance

Please send abstracts (300 words plus bio) or proposals for installations, provocations, film, or performance, by 25 January 2016, to
Johannes Birringer
johannes.birringer@brunel.ac.uk

The context for this international workshop, the fifth Artaud Forum held at Brunel Unversity, is the collaborative European project “Metabody” which works to redefine bodies in media, performance and design. Over the past few years, ‘Metabody’ has developed new architectures and immersive environments which behave like living organisms that have an auditory, visual, and tactile sensory quality, with subtly changing states and affordances, they can be worn and breathed, felt and imagined, transported and taken off.

We invite participants to join us and work with these concepts of integrative tactile experience, kinetic atmospheres, multiperspectival space, and unconscious perception.
‘Metabody’ counteracts dominant technologies and their prevalent tendency to negate differences by reducing bodies and movements to prescribed forms in current surveillance culture. ‘Metabody’ emphasizes openness, and indeterminacy of embodied expressions as a key factor for a sustainable society. This project also foregrounds the need for a new politics. The workshop & performance laboratory probes troubling interpretations of the increasing unrestrainment of capital, and capitalism’s impact on all social-economic, cultural, creative, and educational sectors in a shared developed world now expanded by massive migration and refugee movement. The sustainability of democracy is an urgent theme for all those in the performing arts/creative fields becoming intensely aware of the multiplication of realities (virtualization; networked infrastructures, diasporas) and the tightening of our bodies into technological environments. This is a call for peripheral perception in existential experience.
*      *      *

Our theatre and studio spaces will be available for physical and conceptual workshop encounters over a period of three days (Thursday through Saturday, April 79), including public performances, exhibitions, screenings, and urban situations.
There will be an enrollment fee necessary to cover costs for technical arrangements but they will include some of the catering. The fee for the three-day public event is £ 75  (£ 60 concession) for the whole, or £ 30 (£ 20 concession) per day.
Accommodations can be booked at Brunel’s Lancaster Suites Hotel / Brunel University London, Uxbridge UB8 3PH. Tel. +44 (0) 1895 268006 / email: lancaster-suite@brunel.ac.u

Curated by Johannes Birringer
Venue: Artaud Performance Centre
Brunel University London, Cleveland Rd UB78 3PH
@DAP_Lab
http://people.brunel.ac.uk/dap/metabody.html
www.metabody.eu

Call for Contributions International Conference on Artistic Research, The Hague 28-29 April 2016

Deadline: 11 January 2016

University of the Arts The Hague & Leiden University
Followed by the General Assembly of the Society for Artistic Research 30 April 2016
Venues: Royal Conservatoire and Royal Academy of Art

Conference theme: WRITING

KEYNOTE PRESENTATIONS
Christa-Maria Lerm Hayes
, Professor of Modern and Contemporary Art History,
University of Amsterdam
Alva Noë, Professor of Philosophy, University of California, Berkeley
Redell Olsen, poet and artist, Reader in Poetic Practice, Royal Holloway,
University of London
Michael Schwab, artist and philosopher, editor-in-chief of JAR
Salome Voegelin, artist and writer, Reader in Sound Arts, LCC, University of the Arts London

WORKSHOP STRANDS
1.    Poetics of Critical Writing
Workshop leader:  Julieta Aranda, artist, editor of e-flux journal, Berlin & New York
2.    Writing Sound Art/Music
Workshop leader: Daniela Cascella, writer, Assistant Professor in Writing, Bergen Academy of Art and Design, Associate Lecturer in Sound Arts, LCC, University of the Arts London
3.    Writing Art in Digital Space
Workshop leaders: Barnaby Drabble, curator and writer, Ecole Cantonale d’Art du Valais, managing editor of JAR, and Julian Klein, director and composer, Institut für künstlerische Forschung, Berlin, editor of JAR
4.    Art, Philosophy, Writing and Speech
Workshop leaders: Alva Noë, and Henk Borgdorff, University of the Arts, The Hague, president of SAR

PLENARY FORUM: WRITING AND THE ART SCHOOL
Moderators: Daniela Cascella and Kate Briggs, writer and translator, Lecturer Paris College of Art and Piet Zwart Institute Rotterdam.

SPECIAL SESSION: WRITING FUNDING APPLICATIONS
Alexander Damianisch, Universität für angewandte Kunst Wien, former manager of the Austrian programme for Arts-based Research (PEEK), board member of SAR

About the conference

The relationship between artistic practice and writing in the context of research is a challenging and much debated topic, both in and outside the framework of art degree programmes. Often the relationship is felt to be one of friction, opposition or paradox. Writing gives an explicit verbal account of the implicit knowledge and understanding embodied in artistic practices and products while at the same time art may escape or go beyond what can be expressed by words and resist (academic) conventions of accountability. A ‘written element’ is almost always asked for in the context of higher arts education, as well as by funding agencies, so the artist-researcher in that context often feels cornered, and has to meet opposing demands at the same time.

However, in the debate on art practice and writing the fact that writing itself is a practice is often bypassed. Giving a linguistic expression to one’s research is work that demands as much dedication and commitment as creative work does. Moreover, writing is not just practice, but itself creative work, a constructive process that enables the emergence of the new and the unforeseen. What is the role of writing in artistic research and what type of voices may emerge?

Furthermore, while writing can be seen as a form of practice, the same is true for the inverse: in the context of artistic research, practice is a form of writing; a non-propositional form of writing, to be sure, but in artistic research material practices and products not only embody knowledge and understanding, but as agents in a methodological sense, are also the vehicles by which that knowledge and understanding is produced and conveyed. Here practice is making a case, a claim; a discursive practice that comprises (paradoxically?) non-discursive, i.e. non-propositional material.

This year’s SAR conference will address writing in relation to artistic research from these perspectives: writing as practice and practice as writing. How do both writing and practice operate as ways to convey new knowledge, understanding and experiences by which we (re)organize our lives? In workshops, demonstrations, performances, discussions, open sessions and on-the-spot encounters we will contribute to the ongoing development of the relationship between practice and writing in the context of artistic research.

The conference, along with the keynote presentations, will include parallel workshops in the four strands mentioned above. We invite you to submit a proposal for a contribution to one of the strands and intend to provide space for in-depth discussions and active involvement of all participants. We are therefore asking for proposals of 5 to 10 minutes for statements, performances, short papers, interventions, and proclamations. Although we are not following the traditional format of a longer paper followed by Q and A we will accept a few proposals for longer papers (up to 20 minutes) if it is relevant to the intended strand. All of this will provide the ground for intense discussions during the conference on its theme: the relationship of art practice and writing in the context of research.

Please submit your proposal, of no more than 300 words, before 11 January 2016. Indicate which strand you are submitting for and the duration of what you are proposing as well as any special requirements you may have for your contribution. E-mail your statement to conference2016@societyforartisticresearch.org, including your name and e-mail address and, if applicable, your affiliation and relevant web link.
The selection of proposals will be completed by 15 February 2016.

Conference committee:

Henk Borgdorff – The Hague, Netherlands
Marcel Cobussen – Leiden, Netherlands
Alexander Damianisch – Vienna, Austria
Johan Haarberg – Bergen, Norway
Anya Lewin – Plymouth, UK
Frans de Ruiter – Leiden, Netherlands
Janneke Wesseling – The Hague/Leiden, Netherlands

Contact: conference2016@societyforartisticresearch.org

GLITCH 2015 – one day conference – 14 Dec 2015

The Centre for Practice Based Research in the Arts at Canterbury Christ Church University is hosting a one day interdisciplinary conference on the politics and poetics of failure, error, disorder and noise on Monday 14th December, 2015.
 
GLITCH 2015 seeks to survey the field of contemporary glitch practice and glitch studies, while aiming also to explore the ways in which the concept might be applied to new areas of arts practice and theory.
 
The fee for the conference is £20.00 (£10.00 for students). Register online at:
Lunch, refreshments and a wine reception are provided.
 
 
PROGRAMME
 
Keynote Speaker: Rosa Menkman (artist and theorist)
– Beyond Resolution: DCT Syphoning
 
Dr Adam Smyth (Balliol College, University of Oxford)
– Doing Things with Errors in Renaissance England
 
Prof. Sita Popat (University of Leeds), Prof. Sarah Whatley (Coventry University) and Prof. Susan Kozel (Malmö University)
– The Error Network: A project report
 
Dr Alan Meades (Canterbury Christ Church University)
– Kill Screen to Goat Simulator: Rhetorics of the videogame glitch
 
Ianis Lallemand (École Nationale Supérieure des Arts Décoratifs, Paris)
– Material Glitch: Designing with digital fabrication artifacts
 
Matthew Johnson (Goldsmiths University of London / Liverpool John Moores University)
– Interrupting the Everyday Aesthetic Regime
 
Kate McLean (Canterbury Christ Church University)
– A Glitch in the Sensorium
 
Charles Linehan (Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance)
– Using Decay, Interference and Glitches in Performance Practice
 
Kevin Logan (University of the Arts London)
– The re_etive _losive as _erformative device
 
Prof. Roger Redgate (Goldsmiths University of London) and Prof. Matt Wright (Canterbury Christ Church University)
– Single Combat
 
Dr Robert Robertson (composer and filmmaker)
– The Perils of Perfection (why the ‘glitch’ is fundamental to creativity)
 
Panos Ghikas (Canterbury Christ Church University)
– The Film Sextet: A performance malfunction and the wrong audience
 
Dr James Newton (Canterbury Christ Church University)
– How to Read the Accidental Glitch
 
Live Performance: Bog Bodies – Robert Stillman [UK] Ben Rowley [UK] Seán Carpio [Ireland] and Anders Holst [Denmark]
 
Venue: Powell Building, North Holmes Road Campus, Canterbury Christ Church University, CT1 1QU.
 
Schedule: 09.15-10.00 Registration and coffee. Conference closes 18.00.
 
For more information email andy.birtwistle@canterbury.ac.uk
 

Rosemary Lee’s residency seminar: “She touches my hand to know me”

“She touches my hand to know me”
Rosemary Lee presents her current explorations & ponderings

Thursday 12 November, 7pm FREE
Michaelis Dance Theatre, University of Roehampton SW15 5PJ

Rosemary Lee received a Bonnie Bird New Choreography Award in 2013. Since then she has taken time to ponder one poem alone: ‘Touch’ by Michael Donaghy, out of which comes the title of this presentation. The further she delves into the various strands of enquiry that the poem opens to her, the more a web of interests expands and tangles and sends her to a new book, thought, confusion or person to talk to.

Through words and even perhaps movement, she will reveal her continuing exploration of this poem and how it has affected her. Touch, knowledge, intimacy, motherhood, evolution, time, communication, the origins of words and language, the hand and its extraordinary capacity to discover and to express… this one simple poem opens the door to the rich and complex business of being alive and human.

This event is supported by the Bonnie Bird Choreography Fund, 2013 BBCF Biennial New Award.

More: http://www.roehampton.ac.uk/Research-Centres/Centre-for-Dance-Research/Events/

DR@FT Open Forum Invite

Open Forum

Wednesday 4th November 2015 6-8.30pm

AMATA Production Space from 6pm

Sharing in studio B

‘Only Connect…Live in fragments no more’ (?)

EM Forster

Evening will feature presentations from dance department staff on their current research followed by a brief a sharing of practice and open discussion on connectivity.

Presentations:

  •  Kyra Norman –  Thoughts on making ‘Haunted by Haunted: A Tribute Act’: performing the practice of research, in the form of a choreographed chat
  •  Ruth Pethybridge – From Direct Action to Being There: Choreographing Communities in Dance and Occupy Protests
  • Katrina Brown – Choreographic notes on documenting processes in Translucent Surface/Quiet body:  choreographics of forces, surfaces, body and documents
  •  Simon Birch – Excerpt from Shoreline work in progress and dialogues on social engagement

 

Responding to the research theme of Creative, Connected Communities, the discussion will broadly discuss the idea of connectivity in dance and performance engaging with the following research questions as starting points:

 

  • How do embodied forms connect/intersect with digital forms?
  • How does dance research connect with its participants as a co-creative act?
  • How might fragmentation and disconnection also be part of choreographic practice?

Drinks & nibbles provided, please RSVP for catering purposes:

ruth.pethybridge@falmouth.ac.uk